By Frank Cho (plot, cover art), Doug Murray (script), Adriano Batista (art), Frank Martin (colors)

You can’t expect too much from a book like this. One look at the cover and the title pretty much sums up what you’re about to get into. Delays have plagued this issue (I think it’s two months late), so I’ve sorta forgot what the story’s about.

I know there’s a crew of civilized people stuck on this island. Jana (the Jungle Girl) was helping them out when some rival natives capture the refugees. The tribe’s all-knowing leader, Dream Walker, says that if Jana can enter this sacred cave and slay the beast within, she and her refugees are free to go. Well, not only does she slay the beast, she slays the tribe’s leader in ultra violent fashion. From there a chase into the abyss begins.

Scripter, Doug Murray, is no Shakespeare, but he manages to write decent dialogue into the mouths of the characters. And penciler, Adriano Batista, is no Frank Cho, but he’s pretty darn good in his own right. His storytelling is easy to follow. In fact, one could easily follow this book without ever reading a single line of dialogue. His work is digitally inked so there’s a mixed result at times when his pencils aren’t so tight. I do wish he had an inker – the art would look so much more refined. Frank Martin’s colors are a mixed bag as well. When he colors the characters, they look amazing. But there are times when things look over-colored or too flat (like after the worm chewing scene). It’s just a bit inconsistent.

Jungle Girl is a book grounded in high adventure, unapologetic violence, and gratuitous amounts of fan service. If you’re into this kind of stuff, it’s fun for what it is. If you’re not, well, you knew you were never going to buy this book to begin with. If these delays continue, you’re probably better off waiting for the trade paperback, because you’ll just forget what happened in the issue before. (Grade: C)

– J.Montes

Grade

Conclusion